Throwback Thursday: Chicago Becomes Incorporated

Considering the fact that Chicago boasts a present day population of over 2.7 million people, it is hard to believe that there was a time where it was nothing more than a tiny village. However such a time does exist on the historical record. On August 12, 1833, Chicago became incorporated for the first time as a Town. Sporting a population of just 350 people back then, the Windy City covered less than half of a square mile confined by Kinzie Street, Des Plaines Street, Madison Street and State Street.

Rare view looking west on South Water Street possibly in the 1830s. Hogan’s store was at South Water and Market Streets, while Wolf Point Tavern can be seen in the distance.
From a painting owned by the Chicago History Museum

It was during the years after its incorporation where Chicago’s population truly started to blossom. By 1837, Chicago’s population had exploded to over 4,000 people. It was the 92nd-largest city in the United States and it was only getting bigger as schools, churches and businesses were popping up everywhere. One of the other reasons Chicago’s population expanded at such a fast rate is its newfound prominence as a transportation hub. The Illinois and Michigan Canal came to fruition in 1848, making it possible for ships carrying consumer goods to pass through Chicago from the Great Lakes en route to the Mississippi River.

Despite the Great Chicago Fire of 1871, Chicago only kept growing. By 1890 it was the second largest city in the country, following New York, even after most of the city had to be rebuilt because of the fire. Coming from such humble beginnings, Chicago has always been known for its grit and resilience. It does not hold the flashiness of say New York or LA — but it has a certain edge to it in the sense that it can face anything that stands in its way, and will always come out on top. I would not count on that changing anytime soon.

Chicago Traffic 1833, Wolf Point
Wolf Point Tavern (Left) Millers Tavern (Right)

Ever Evolved Twitter | Facebook | Soundcloud | Instagram

Woman Crush Wednesday: L11

L11 is hard to miss whether it is conquering open mics, holding her own in beefy local lineups or serving a cake shake that would put Portillo’s out of business in CantBuyDeem’s Thumb music video. The hip-hop and R&B artist has carved out a defined role for herself in Chicago’s musical community. With a seamless blend of social consciousness and uncompromising agency, L11 owns her sexuality proudly in the face of objectification. “You gotta wait, wait, wait, til I say go/ you gotta understand me if I say no”, she raps on the track Consent, a sultry bop with crisp, decidedly NSFW visuals by Rena Naltsas. According to the video’s description on YouTube, the song was created in partnership with the Chicago Votes Give a Shit collective to address the necessity of consent, as it builds trust and makes fantasies a reality. Since her 2015 debut project Nefertiti, L11’s artistry has been honed to a razor’s edge. Encompassing soulful melodies like those that fill the island vibe-tinged Spring (Self Love) as well as scathing bars to remind listeners she is not to be mesesd with. On the twerk-inducing W.A.N she delivers a cold dose of reality to leagues of fake thugs and other would-be suitors. “You ain’t even got no goals, lil n****, I fuck around and snatch you right up out your soul, lil n****”, raps L11 over tumbling percussion. A true master of her brand, she is designed a line of Good Pussy Energy merch to rep the self-produced anthem of the same title. She handles her business and expects anyone she lets herself get involved with to do the same, declaring “energy so pure I swear my demons steady duckin’”. Recently L11’s latest single B has been racking up plays, as one could expect with a beat from a union of the artists signature assertiveness and powerhouse producer DJ Skoli. In a dynamic script-flip of rap’s favorite and most controversial term for a woman, she wastes no time letting the people know; “B is for bitch, say it loud…When you see me, I be killing this shit.” At this stage in the game, L11 has shown not only potential but real progress while maintaining an entirely authentic voice that rings relatable for strong women and those who admire them. Whether putting it down on stage or in another artfully-directed video, we cannot wait to see what is next for this promising femme fatale.

L11 | Soundcloud | Twitter | Facebook | Instagram

Ever Evolved Twitter | Facebook | Soundcloud | Instagram

Chicago to Woodstock: Crosby, Stills, Nash and Young.

This last weekend in the year 1969 saw one of the greatest gatherings of human beings in the expression of music, freedom and love in the history of our country. Woodstock ’69 was four days of non stop music performance and $1 lysergic acid tabs hitting the bloodstream, causing the mass consciousness in the audience to experience the stars of that era in unforgettable fashion. A time spent with the likes of Carlos Santana, Joan Baez, Jimi Hendrix, Janis Joplin, Jefferson Airplane and many more icons.

There are some wildly unorganized aspects of the festival setup Woodstock the Netflix Documentary brought to light. The curators had major problems with the neighboring towns-folk being against the festival. It was also put together last minute; the stage was not completed until the first actual day of the festival when 50,000 people were already there. Not enough people to set up a fencing perimeter in time caused the biggest free music event, as the masses poured into the field. With food shortages half way in and medical supplies running out, National Guard troops were threatening a takeover. Regardless of all of that, Woodstock has gone down as one of the most unifying moments in music history as the towns people donated food and the guard delivered supplies.

Looking back on events in music history in relation to Chicago, on the 16th of August, Crosby, Stills, Nash and Young played in our great gritty city at the Auditorium Theater. The very next day they played Woodstock, Sunday August 17th in up state New York. Knowing that every single artist and band member had to be flown in via helicopter it is safe to assume the folk rock quartet flew to Woodstock from Chicago. Now adding more significance to night they played the Auditorium Theater in Chicago before Woodstock the very next day, it was their first performance with the singer songwriter Neil Young added to the super group! Joni Mitchell was their opener and Crosby, Stills, and Nash had just released their debut record of that May, 1969.

So to think about how life can just fall into place at a speed faster than light. The aforementioned example displays that I believe. A trio drops a record in May, becomes a quartet in August, plays Woodstock the day after adding a new member. From Chicago to Woodstock with love, 1969.

Ever Evolved Twitter | Facebook | Soundcloud | Instagram

 

Throwback Thursday: Chicago Is Planned & Recognized

August 4th, 1830 is a day regarded by Historians in Illinois as the day Chicago was recognized. Given Chicago’s location by the Great Lakes, financiers looked at the land as an opportunity for a transportation hub. The Illinois legislature appointed James Thompson to survey and plat the town which had a population of about 100 people. He laid out the town for Canal Commissioners in preparation for the sale of lots to finance a proposed Illinois and Michigan Canal; its first sales on Sept. 4, 1830. The filing of the plans marked the first recognition of the municipality of Chicago.

James Thompson plat of Chicago

Originally the area was inhabited by native Algonquian people including the Mascouten and Miami. The name Chicago came from a French version of the native word Shikaakwa, or Stinky Onion, due to wild garlic growing abundandlty in the area. The first known reference of the area of Chicago came in a memoir from 1679 by Robert De LaSalle, noting the abundance of Chicagoua. Chicago’s first permanent, non-native settler is a black man that goes by the name of Jean Baptiste Point Du Sable and regarded as the founder of Chicago. The farm he built at the mouth of the Chicago River near Lake Michigan is now a national historical landmark at what is now 401 N Michigan Ave, Pioneer Court.

On August 12th, 1833 the Town of Chicago was established with a population of 350. One year later the first Schooner named the Illinois from New York enters the harbor, marking Great Lakes trade relationship between the two booming cities. Rich farmlands attracted many Yankee settlers that overnight created a city through real estate and trade. The city quickly grew demanding warehouse, rails and dock yards to be built for transportation and trade. By 1850’s over 30 rail lines entered the city making Chicago the transportation hub of the United States. Chicago was granted a city charter by the state of Illinois on March 4, 1837 and the city of Chicago was born with over 4,000 to its population.

Ever Evolved Twitter | Facebook | Soundcloud | Instagram

Throwback Thursday: Happy Birthday to Verdine White; Long Time Bassist of Earth, Wind and Fire.

The year is 1951 on the 25th of July. The bassist Verdine White, who is most known for playing with Earth, Wind, and Fire, was born in Chicago Illinois. Verdine White is ranked as being the no. 27th all time bass player by Bass Player’s List of the 100 Greatest Bass Players of All Time. He started playing with Earth, Wind, and Fire at the age of seventeen due to his older brother Maurice White being the founder, main record producer, and co-lead singer. Today his net worth is over 10 million dollars. These are the types of success stories that define Chicago music and culture in history.

In an interview with Microphone Check with Frannie and Ali, Verdine White got to sit down with the platform to give a little insight into the history of himself and the great band that became Earth, Wind, and Fire. His older brother Maurice and Ramsey Lewis originally were going to name the band Salty Peppers (Salt N Peppa ended up being a thing years later ironically enough) until Maurice decided to name the band after his astrological chart which did not contain the element water. It only had earth, air, and fire; Maurice decided to rename air to wind. And thus a legendary band is born.

According to Verdine White his older brother Maurice instilled a foundational sound and musicality in the group through his extensive study of Miles Davis and John Coltrane. He credits Maurice with his and the entire bands legacy and success. Verdine White’s father was a saxophonist and a drummer by passion and a doctor by trade. He instilled an attitude of strict proper musicianship in his sons according to Verdine. Maurice was ten years older than Verdine elder and the two technically did not start playing together till they were out in California.

Verdine says Maurice was always encouraging and always took him seriously although, Verdine was not ready to keep up with his brother for years. One day Maurice told Verdine, “I need you at the studio in case the bass player doesn’t show up“. Even though the bass player did show up that day, the energy that Maurice wanted to give Verdine and uplift his little brother as a musician was definitely there! Even though it took years for Verdine White to end up playing with his beloved brother, that is now past on, from age ten onward Verdine’s life has been nothing but music.

It was interesting to read about his experiences in Chicago through the 60’s, according to him music related things were happening constantly. Whether Verdine was practicing to keep up with his brothers and father, attending shows with his mother, putting on events for Maurice, or just studying and learning from his older contemporaries, Verdine was always entrenched within the culture of Chicago music. And to me the most awesome fact is that, according to Verdine, he was completely sober and focused through his teen years due to what was required of him as a musician. He did not party, he did not do drugs, there was only one thing he had to do back then and that was play music. Happy birthday to a real Chicago legend, Verdine White of Earth, Wind, and Fire!

Ever Evolved | Twitter | Facebook | Soundcloud | Instagram

Throwback Thursday: The Night Disco Died

The late 1970’s saw the rise of Disco Music all around the United States. In between numerous chart-topping hits and the dance clubs that were seemingly everywhere it had become clear that this new fad had firmly etched itself into the fabric of American Culture. However this new obsession was not without backlash as Rock ‘N’ Roll fans and disc jockeys alike had a special distaste for this new type of dance music. In fact, this distaste was so strong that it even spilled over into Major League Baseball in an event that became known as Disco Demolition.

It was July 12, 1979 and it was a humid summer night at Chicago’s Comiskey Park, where the White Sox were hosting a twi-night doubleheader against the Detroit Tigers. As the result of a losing season, the White Sox’ attendance was dwindling down to an average of just 16,000 people per game. White Sox owner Bill Veeck, who was well known for using outlandish PR stunts in order to boost attendance, was looking for another way to boost attendance during another lost season.

Popular local radio DJ Steve Dahl, who worked for WLUP, developed a reputation for his hatred of disco as he would blow up records on his radio show. Representatives from the White Sox and WLUP radio station met to discuss a Disco Demolition themed promotion and they settled on Steve Dahl blowing up a crate of records in the outfield in between the two games. Tickets for that event went for as low as 98 cents if fans brought an album that they wanted to see get destroyed. Though around 20,000 people were expected to show up that night, the total attendance figure ended up being more than 50,000 people as fans continued to sneak in even after the gates had closed.

White Sox Comiskey Park Disco Demolition Explosion

The first game took place without incident, as the Tigers ended up winning 4-1. Then, around 8:40PM everything changed. Steve Dahl drove out to center field in a jeep, dressed in a helmet and an army fatigue. He led the crowd in a “Disco Sucks!” chant before telling the 50,000+ attendees that this event was the world’s largest anti-disco rally. Dahl had the records in a giant box, ready to be blown up. After counting up to 4, Dahl let loose on the explosion and fiery streaks lit up the outfield followed up by large scores of debris.

However what really is notable about all of this, is the events that followed. After Dahl exited the field following the demolition, a few restless fans stormed the field in a fit of celebration. After the first few, the fans kept coming and coming. Just a few minutes later, Comiskey Park was in total chaos. The bases had been stolen, the outfield was in flames and empty liquor bottles were all over the place. There was even a thick veil of weed smoke that covered a chunk of the stadium due to a massive amount of marijuana consumption among the patrons.

White Sox personnel tried everything in their power to calm things down. Announcer Harry Carray tried convincing fans to go back to their seats over the intercom, Take Me Out To The Ballgame played and security was everywhere trying their best to keep the peace. It was not until the Chicago Police Department arrived dressed in full riot gear that things finally started to calm down. In total, 39 people were arrested for Disorderly Conduct, numerous people suffered minor injuries and the field was too badly damaged for the two teams to play on.

A couple of things happened after that night. First, the White Sox were forced to forfeit the second game of the doubleheader due to the damage of the stadium. Secondly, the popularity of Disco waned as the 1980’s were just around the corner. Whether Disco Demolition was a direct cause of Disco’s fade into the background has been a subject of debate in the 41 years since. Steve Dahl marked in an interview years later that Disco was more than likely on its way out either way. However, the music faded out so quickly after that night that it seems likely Disco Demolition is at least partly to blame.

Ever Evolved | Twitter | Facebook | Soundcloud | Instagram

Throwback Thursday: The World’s First Skyscraper

Chicago has long been well known for its stunning skylines and innovative take on architecture. However what few people know is that Chicago is actually the birthplace of the modern day skyscraper.

Designed by architect William Le Baron Jenney in 1884, The Home Insurance Building opened its doors a year later at the intersection of LaSalle and Adams. Consisting of 10 stories and standing at 138 feet in height, The Home Insurance Building has come to be known as the world’s first skyscraper. It was the first building of its kind whose frame held structural steel, though the majority of it consisted of wrought iron and cast.

Historians attribute the construction of The Home Insurance Building to the architectural boom that took place in Chicago after the Great Fire of 1871. As a result of the aforementioned fire, 3.3 square miles of the cityscape was left destroyed, and since the majority of its buildings back then were made of wood, nearly all of them burned down in the flames. With the majority of the city rotting in rubble, Chicago underwent one of the most famous architectural booms in history; one that would spur its economy as well as reshape the cities’ architectural outlook.

Replacing the wood structures that stood on Chicago’s grounds before the fire, the newer buildings were made out of stone, steel and iron. Building in this manner was considered to be ahead of its time and The Home Insurance Building served as a prime example of this new style of architecture. The Home Insurance Building became one of Jenney’s crowning architectural achievements, and it also spawned an entire generation of architects and engineers dubbed as “The Chicago School.”

This generation, which consisted of famous architects such as Daniel Burnham, continued to lay the groundwork for what the modern day skyscraper would eventually become. Though New York City eventually surpassed Chicago as the hub of architectural innovation, Chicago remains as the city that laid the groundwork for any and all innovation that followed. Chicago will forever remain the birthplace of the modern day skyscraper. Sadly, The Home Insurance Building was demolished in 1931 and the LaSalle Bank Building now stands in its place.

Ever Evolved | Twitter | Facebook | Soundcloud | Instagram

Throwback Thursday: the Rolling Stones Record in Chicago

Chicago is a dynamic city filled with all kinds of draw ins from its history, architecture and especially music. Birthplace of house music, countless talented artists and jive with a bustling blues culture here in particular, it welcomes quite a variety of icons and artists to the city for its inspiring quality and treasure troves of figure heads to work. This weeks Throwback Thursday for June we remember the Rolling Stones passing through Chicago to leave their mark in music history!

When Starting their first tour in the United States the Rolling Stones first arrive in New York, June 1st, 1964;just a few months after the Beatles make their US debut. Following a few radio and television appearances and live performances the Stones note the absolute highlight of their trip: Recording at Chess Records on Michigan Ave. Owned by two Polish brothers Leonard and Phil Chess, it is home to many legendary blues artists such as Willie Dixon, Howlin’ Wolf, Chuck Berry, Buddy Guy, Bo Diddley, and most notably Muddy Waters. These Chicago Blues artists have been the driving force in the creation of the Rolling Stones. It is there they recorded some of their first hit singles to top American charts, already being popular in England.

June 10th, 1964 the Rolling Stones land in Chicago to record in the US for the first time at Chess Records Studio, the leading Blues recording label in the 50’s and 60’s. Legend has it that Muddy Waters was there himself to help the artists unpack. “2120 South Michigan Ave was hallowed ground. We got there on a last-minute arrangement by Andrew Oldham (manager)”, Keith Richards wrote in Life Magazine. “There in the perfect sound studio, in the room where everything we listened to was made, perhaps out of relief or just the fact that people like Buddy Guy, Chuck Berry and Willie Dixon were wandering in and out, we recorded 14 tracks in two days“. The studio would be later immortalized by the dedicated song 2120 South Michigan Ave.

It was in these two days their EP Five by Five and much of their second studio album 12×5, that both featured the address title track, were recorded. Keith Richards was quoted saying, “Everyone in England at the time was incapable… No one could get a really good funky American sound which is what WE were after. The best move we could possibly do was get to America as quickly as possible and record there”. Coming out of the sessions also is their hit single Its All Over Now that claimed their name to fame in the US. Other notable songs would include Time Is on My Side, Look What You Done and Down the Road Apiece. They would later return to Chess months later in November 1964, during their second US tour, where Kieth Richards lays down the riff to the legendary (I Can’t Get No) Satisfaction.

Between sessions the Rolling Stones hold a press conference June 11 on Michigan Ave in front of the Tribune building. Mick Jagger was noted stating, “We have changed a bit since we got famous. I mean, how would you like to sing the same seven numbers every night? I may not be much of a singer but there is no artistry in that. Still, we do have fun as well“. Police later arrived to break up the press conference but not before jeering, “Get outta here or I’ll lock up the whole goddamned bunch“. The Rolling Stones never returned to Chess Record but held a big roll in bringing the Chicago Blues sound to mainstream audiences.

Rolling Stones in font of Tribune Building

Ever Evolved Twitter | Facebook | Soundcloud | Instagram

Throwback Thursday: Chicago’s First “L” Service

Thus begins the weekly historical section of Ever Evolved popularly titled Throwback Thursday. We will use this section every week to highlight a specific historical event pertinent to the city’s upbringing and colorful past.

On June 6th 1892 the private company Chicago and South Side Rapid Transit (later renamed South Side Elevated Railroad) conducted their first ever L ride that morning at 7AM. The trains spanned from Congress to 39th street, now the south section of the Green Line, and extended to Jackson Park shortly after. The portion of the elevated line that ran between State and Wabash became to be known as the Alley “L”.

South Side Elevated Railroad Train at Indiana Ave Station

The early train car models featured wooden varnished and cushioned seats. Rides cost a nickel, ran for 24 hours, were lit by gas lamps and the steam-powered locomotives pulled the trains. Customers would have to deal with some steam, smoke and cinders from the engine but this was normal for the time period and the technology.

In fear of people falling of the platforms and onto the tracks they installed railings. Unfortunately these were cumbersome and did not always line up with the trains sliding into the station. After a short while they were removed. The Lake Street Elevated Railroad, today as the west section of the Green Line, was completed a year after just in time for the 1893 Worlds Fair held in Chicago.

Lake Street Elevated Railroad train pulled by steam-powered locomotive

In 1895 the Metropolitan West Side Elevated Railroad added their services to Logan Square, Humbolt Park (demolished), Garfield Park (replaced) and Douglas Park areas branching off from downtown Chicago. Parts of this line is used now as the Blue and Pink Lines. It is the first of Chicago’s transit lines to be electrically powered and the first non-exhibition rapid transit system powered by electric traction motors in the United States. This technology was demonstrated on the “intramural railway” at the World Fair in Chicago.

The Northwestern Elevated Railroad emerged in 1900 with the original deadline being 1899 but construction temporarily halted two years prior due to financial backing issues. After an inaugural run declaring it unsafe, the company defiantly ran a train to the Loop, transferring onto Lake Street Elevated to avoid police. Eventually the company and the city reached an agreement. This line ran from the Loop to Wilson with a branch extending to Ravenswood and Albany Park. The branch now operates as the Brown Line while the main line to Wilson operates as the Red and Purple.

Chicago Rapid Transit Map

The merging of the South Side Elevated, Lake Street Elevated, Metropolitan West Side and Northwestern Elevated Railroad private companies created the Chicago Elevated Railways Collateral Trust (CER). Laying down the ground work for Chicago Rapid Trasit Company (CRT) in 1924, they continued under private ownership. After the opening of the subway system in 1943, by 1947 it merged into the Chicago Transit Authority (CTA) we know today following a public takeover. Since its start over, 125 years later the CTA sees more than a million riders daily and has a combined 224.1 miles of rail. The rails are now electric, cleaner, and quieter.

Ever Evolved | Soundcloud | Facebook | Twitter | Instagram

Essse Guey All Day (Music Video)

Everybody has an artist they listen to all day on repeat no matter how many times they have heard them. Come across ESSSE Guey and you might find yourself in a similar predicament. Fusing a bit of Hispanic culture and lyricism into Hip Hop he adds a unique touch to his already outlandish persona. A persona that videographer Lonnie Edwards captures nicely, again through imagery with a second music video project for ESSSE following his V.I.M.M. (Let It Reign) music video.

Linking up with fellow Chicago Hip Hop head who recently released his own EP dubbed Pure Noon, RhymSter hits the first verse heavy after letting the beat run off. ESSSE ends it strong with a catchy flow leaving you feeling like hitting that replay button. He releases this track as his first single off his forthcoming project DREAMWORXXX which, judging by this song, is likely to be filled with plenty raw and authentic hip hop and nothing less. No official release dates yet so lets stay updated on his links & browse his latest releases.

Essse | Soundcloud | Facebook | Twitter | Instagram

Ever Evolved | Twitter | Facebook | Soundcloud | Instagram